Home » Five Months at Cairo and in Lower Egypt, Tr. by W. Conn, with Additional Notes by the Author by Gabriel Charmes
Five Months at Cairo and in Lower Egypt, Tr. W. Conn, with Additional Notes by the Author by Gabriel Charmes

Five Months at Cairo and in Lower Egypt, Tr.

W. Conn, with Additional Notes by the Author by Gabriel Charmes

Published February 4th 2012
ISBN : 9781150238925
Paperback
170 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VI. CAIRO.--CONTINUED. DaybreakMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VI. CAIRO.--CONTINUED. Daybreak in Egypt has not those successive and graduated tints that one admires in the South of France. The sun lights all at once the edge of the sky. Hardly announced by a rose glimmering, it bursts suddenly on the horizon and sets in a few moments the whole atmosphere ablaze. Sometimes, however, in winter, and oftener perhaps than one might suppose, it has to raise, before showing itself, the long folds of a greyish mantle that cover the earth all around. The soil of Egypt, watered and heated at the same time, impregnated with the water of the Nile to its full depth, always in evaporation, and having light vapours continually escaping, is covered in the morning with a kind of transparent haze, which reminds one at first sight of the fogs of Paris. But as soon as the red disc of the sun appears over the Mokatam Hill, this thick veil is rent in every direction- in an hour, at most, the humidity of the air is absorbed- it is barely if a few flakes of cloud, tinted by the breaking day, are still floating over the blue of the firmament. Except during the period of the Kamsin, when the air is charged with a reddish dust that the wind perpetually stirs up and never disperses, the rays of the sun pierce rapidly the atmosphere- the coolness and humidity of the night give place, as if by enchantment, to the dryness and the limpidity of the day. It is at the foot of the Mosque of Mehemet-Ali, and the terrace of the Citadel, that it is so fine to see the break of day over still half-slumbering Cairo. It is impossible to render the effect of a panorama which is then presented to the sight- it is unquestionably one of the finest in the world, one of those especially that awakens in the mind the most souvenirs, whilst it produces on the...