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Love Among the Artists Volume 10 George Bernard Shaw

Love Among the Artists Volume 10

George Bernard Shaw

Published
ISBN : 9781230232836
Paperback
114 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ... world she would beMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1907 edition. Excerpt: ... world she would be mocked at as a madwoman. Your scientific Mademoiselle Sutherland is, in my opinion, no great things. Adrian looked at his wife with surprise, and with some displeasure- but the music recommenced just then, and the conversation dropped. Some compositions of Mendelssohn were played- and these he applauded emphatically, whilst she sat silent with averted face. When the concert was over they saw the Hoskyns drive away in a neat carriage- and Herbert, who had never in his bachelor days envied any man the possession of such a luxury, felt sorry that he had to hire a hansom for his wifes accommodation. Adrian had not yet found a suitable permanent residence. They lived on the first floor of a house in the Kensington Road. Aurelie, who had always left domestic matters to her mother, knew little about housekeeping, and could not be induced to take an interest in house-hunting. The landlady at Kensington Road supplied them with food- and Adrian paid a heavy bill every week, Aurelie exclaiming that the amount was unheard of, and the woman wicked, but not taking any steps to introduce a more economical system. They reached their lodging at a quarter before twelve- and Adrian, when Aurelie had gone upstairs, turned out the gas and chained the door, knowing that the rest of the household were in bed. As he followed her up, he heard the pianoforte, and, entering the room, saw her seated at it. She did not look round at him, but continued playing, with her face turned slightly upward and to one side--an attitude habitual to her in her musical moments. He moved uneasily about the room for some time- put aside his overcoat- turned down a jet of gas that flared- and rearranged some trifles on the mantelpiece. Then he said: Is it not...