Home » Islam in Japan Islam in Japan: Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque by Books LLC
Islam in Japan Islam in Japan: Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque Books LLC

Islam in Japan Islam in Japan: Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque

Books LLC

Published September 28th 2010
ISBN : 9781157036913
Paperback
30 pages
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Chapters: Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 28. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge.MoreChapters: Maulavi Barkatullah, Kobe Mosque. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 28. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: Maulavi Abdul Hafiz Mohamed Barakatullah or Maulana Barkatullah (c. 7 July 1854 20 September 1927) was a staunch anti-British Indian revolutionary with sympathy for the Pan-Islamic movement. Barkatullah was born on 7 July 1854 at Itwra Mohalla Bhopal in Madhya Pradesh, India. Barkatullah fought from outside India, with fiery speeches and revolutionary writings in leading newspapers, for the independence of India. Even in the face of adversity and discouragement, Barkatullah rose to a position of pre-eminence in more than one sphere of life by sheer force of merit and hard work. He did not live to see India free but his contribution did bring independence much nearer. He had educated from primary to college level at Bhopal. Later he went to Bombay and London for his higher education. He was a meritorious scholar and mastered seven languages: Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Turkish, English, German, and Japanese. Born of parents in rather indifferent circumstances he had nothing but his own brilliance and firmness of purpose to help him at school and colleges. Even so, he topped the list of successful candidates in most of the examinations for which he appeared, both in India and England. He became the Quondam Professor of Urdu at the Tokyo University Japan. Son of Munshi Shaikh Kadaratullah, employed in the service of Bhopal State, Barakatullah lost his father at the age of twelve. Barakatullah was a very clever youth, (who) left home about 1883 and was employed as a tutor in Khandwa and later in Bombay, notes J.C. Ker. He In 1887 he came to London, giving private lessons in Arabic, Persian, and Urdu, while himself learning German, French, and Japanese. He was invited by the Bri...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=352116